Bisexuality:Colonizing the Middle

David Ley, Ph.D.

As a group, self-identified bisexuals appear to experience high levels of stress and anxiety, often believed to be related to significant issues of stigma and discrimination from both heterosexual and homosexual communities. Bisexuals are often identified as being at high risk for sexual infection transmissions, as well as infidelity. Growing research with bisexuality is revealing the very complex layers and nuances of different forms of bisexual arousal, behavior and identity, with a great many different sexual identities (including pansexuality, sexually fluid, omnisexual, etc.) defining different  approaches to bisexuality. Males experiencing bisexual attractions are at high risk for life and emotional problems, particularly when their desires conflict with moral or social expectations on the individual. This workshop introduces participants to research on the field of bisexuality, exploring the complexity and contradictions within this heterogeneous group, and exploring how to apply these theories and findings to clinical practice.

Objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to recognize the complex and individually-nuanced different aspects of bisexuality, including arousal, identity and behavior.
  2. Participants will learn to clinically apply understanding of the complex internal and social conflicts in bisexuality, to assist them in developing sexual integrity and resolving moral conflicts in bisexual patients.

Changed Objectives:

  1. Describe the complex and individually-nuanced different aspects of bisexuality, including arousal, identity and behavior.
  2. Clinically apply understanding of the complex internal and social conflicts in bisexuality, to assist them in developing sexual integrity and resolving moral conflicts in bisexual patients.